Cafe, a Tumblr theme i

friedriceconnoisseur:

The only thing that would be the cherry on top of this amazing and gorgeous theme is being able to add comments via disqus.
Thanks for making the theme anyway!

Sorry, but Disqus comments aren’t something that will be added to Cafe. Tumblr has plenty of ways that people can respond to your posts (text replies, photo replies, answers, questions, reblogs and likes are the ones I can think of right off the top o’ my head), so I don’t feel that it’s needed like it might have been in the past.

February 2, 2011 @ 6:52 PM 4 notes

eatingwithmeaning:

Hello! Thanks for the great theme...I had a couple questions for you:

1. How can I add a subscribe to this blog button or something similar on my page?
2. How can I make it so that the title of each post can be clicked on, which would then take you to another page with just that post on it?

I really appreciate any help you could provide. Thank you!

Annika
  1. You should be able to do that using pages. Set up a new page and have it redirect to the RSS feed. In your case, that would be http://eatingwithmeaning.tumblr.com/rss.

  2. If you’re willing to dig around in the code, you can do this by going to the area just under {block:Text} and replacing this:

    {block:Title}<h2>{Title}</h2>{/block:Title}
    

    with this:

    {block:Title}<h2><a href="{Permalink}">{Title}</a></h2>{/block:Title}
    
February 2, 2011 @ 6:48 PM 1 note

Anonymous:

The alignment on photo posts really bothers me. How can I change that?

You should be able to modify that using custom CSS. The photos in photo posts are in a paragraph tag called “showPhoto”. So it would be something like this:

.showPhoto {property: value;}
February 2, 2011 @ 6:42 PM 2 notes

awhitesundress:

i installed your cafe theme for tumblr. it looks really nice, you did a great job!! but i wanted to customize it and i was wondering if you knew how to move everything to the right instead of in the center? thanks

Put the following in the Custom CSS box:

body {margin:2em 5em 5em;}
#contain {width:800px; float:right; margin-top:0;}
#footer {width:800px; float:right; margin:1em 0 0; padding-bottom:1em;}

You can change the “800px” depending on how wide or skinny you’d like it to be.

February 2, 2011 @ 6:38 PM 2 notes

bailann:

LOVE the photo slideshow. Super cool. LOVE this theme, exactly what I needed! :)

Thank you for the kind words! (Although Tumblr did the slideshow design, not me.)

January 7, 2011 @ 4:00 PM 1 note

Customization

Colors and the background image are now customizable.

January 7, 2011 @ 12:02 PM

browncollarbarista:

Really love the theme! I was hoping to work a non-drop-down into mine, but I have no idea how to go about that. Basically take the circled "i" at the top out, and just leave the avatar and description permanently on the page.

Thank you for the feedback!

The option to have the info always shown will be added along with custom colors and backgrounds in the next release.

December 17, 2010 @ 11:45 AM 2 notes

Cafe, a Tumblr theme

I&#8217;ve been working on this for about a week and a half now, and I&#8217;ve finally polished it off enough to release to the public. I am quite proud of this one, and I feel like it&#8217;s much better than the previous themes I&#8217;ve released. Check it out by visiting the demo and then feel free to install it if you really like it!

I&#8217;m going to be adding custom colors and background images in the near future, but figured I would release it now that it&#8217;s functional and beautiful (although only in cafe-colors).

If you find anything wonky with it, or anything you&#8217;d like to see added or changed, feel free to drop me a line, and I&#8217;ll see what I can do.

Geeky stuff

This was my first tiny venture into using jQuery created from scratch. Actually, that&#8217;s the whole reason I began creating in the first place. I also used Google&#8217;s font API (with Helvetica and Georgia as fallbacks), some nifty CSS3 tricks, and of course HTML5. I am absolutely stoked about the HTML5/CSS3 stuff that is being standardized, and I can&#8217;t wait to see what they come up with next!

Cafe, a Tumblr theme

I’ve been working on this for about a week and a half now, and I’ve finally polished it off enough to release to the public. I am quite proud of this one, and I feel like it’s much better than the previous themes I’ve released. Check it out by visiting the demo and then feel free to install it if you really like it!

I’m going to be adding custom colors and background images in the near future, but figured I would release it now that it’s functional and beautiful (although only in cafe-colors).

If you find anything wonky with it, or anything you’d like to see added or changed, feel free to drop me a line, and I’ll see what I can do.

Geeky stuff

This was my first tiny venture into using jQuery created from scratch. Actually, that’s the whole reason I began creating in the first place. I also used Google’s font API (with Helvetica and Georgia as fallbacks), some nifty CSS3 tricks, and of course HTML5. I am absolutely stoked about the HTML5/CSS3 stuff that is being standardized, and I can’t wait to see what they come up with next!

December 11, 2010 @ 7:06 PM 22 notes

Here&#8217;s what Wikipedia has to say about the history of marshmallows. This is mostly to give you an idea of how text wraps around photos.


  It seems likely that the marshmallow first came into being as a medicinal substance, since the mucilaginous extracts comes from the root of the marshmallow plant, Althaea officinalis, which were praised as a remedy for sore throats. Concoctions of other parts of the marshmallow plant had medical uses as well. The root has been used since Egyptian antiquity in a honey-sweetened confection useful in the treatment of sore throat. The later French version of the recipe, called pâte de guimauve (or &#8220;guimauve&#8221; for short), included an eggwhite meringue and was often flavored with rose water. Pâte de guimauve more closely resembles contemporary commercially available marshmallows, which no longer contain any actual marshmallow.
  
  The use of marshmallow to make a candy dates back to ancient Egypt, where the recipe called for extracting sap from the plant and mixing it with nuts and honey. Another pre-modern recipe uses the pith of the marshmallow plant, rather than the sap. The stem was peeled back to reveal the soft and spongy pith, which was boiled in sugar syrup and dried to produce a soft, chewy confection. Candymakers in early 19th century France made the innovation of whipping up the marshmallow sap and sweetening it, to make a confection similar to modern marshmallow. The confection was made locally, however, by the owners of small candy stores. They would extract the sap from the mallow plant&#8217;s root, and whip it themselves. The candy was very popular but its manufacture was labor-intensive. In the late 19th century, French manufacturers devised a way to get around this by using egg whites or gelatin, combined with modified corn starch, to create the chewy base. This avoided the laborious extraction process, but it did require industrial methods to combine the gelatin and corn starch in the right way.
  
  Another milestone in the development of the modern marshmallow was the invention of an extrusion process by the American Alex Doumak in 1948. This allowed marshmallows to be manufactured in a fully automated way, and produced the cylindrical shape we now associate with marshmallows. The process involves running the ingredients through tubes, and then extruding the finished product as a soft cylinder, which is then cut into sections and rolled in a mixture of finely powdered cornstarch and confectioner&#8217;s sugar. Doumak founded the Doumak company in 1961 on the strength of his patent on this process.

Here’s what Wikipedia has to say about the history of marshmallows. This is mostly to give you an idea of how text wraps around photos.

It seems likely that the marshmallow first came into being as a medicinal substance, since the mucilaginous extracts comes from the root of the marshmallow plant, Althaea officinalis, which were praised as a remedy for sore throats. Concoctions of other parts of the marshmallow plant had medical uses as well. The root has been used since Egyptian antiquity in a honey-sweetened confection useful in the treatment of sore throat. The later French version of the recipe, called pâte de guimauve (or “guimauve” for short), included an eggwhite meringue and was often flavored with rose water. Pâte de guimauve more closely resembles contemporary commercially available marshmallows, which no longer contain any actual marshmallow.

The use of marshmallow to make a candy dates back to ancient Egypt, where the recipe called for extracting sap from the plant and mixing it with nuts and honey. Another pre-modern recipe uses the pith of the marshmallow plant, rather than the sap. The stem was peeled back to reveal the soft and spongy pith, which was boiled in sugar syrup and dried to produce a soft, chewy confection. Candymakers in early 19th century France made the innovation of whipping up the marshmallow sap and sweetening it, to make a confection similar to modern marshmallow. The confection was made locally, however, by the owners of small candy stores. They would extract the sap from the mallow plant’s root, and whip it themselves. The candy was very popular but its manufacture was labor-intensive. In the late 19th century, French manufacturers devised a way to get around this by using egg whites or gelatin, combined with modified corn starch, to create the chewy base. This avoided the laborious extraction process, but it did require industrial methods to combine the gelatin and corn starch in the right way.

Another milestone in the development of the modern marshmallow was the invention of an extrusion process by the American Alex Doumak in 1948. This allowed marshmallows to be manufactured in a fully automated way, and produced the cylindrical shape we now associate with marshmallows. The process involves running the ingredients through tubes, and then extruding the finished product as a soft cylinder, which is then cut into sections and rolled in a mixture of finely powdered cornstarch and confectioner’s sugar. Doumak founded the Doumak company in 1961 on the strength of his patent on this process.

(via fuckyeahcutenessxo)

December 10, 2010 @ 11:51 PM 61 notes

Anonymous:

What is your coffee of choice?

My coffee of choice is nearly always a white-chocolate mocha (decaf). Funny that I like it so much, and yet still dislike the caffeine. Lately, I’ve been trying out different types of mochas. Just a couple of weeks ago I tried a Mexican mocha, and before that I tried a turtle mocha. I’m pretty sure I’ll always fall-back on the white-chocolate, though.

So what, you ask, is in a mocha? According to Wikipedia:

Like a caffe latte, it is typically one third espresso and two thirds steamed milk, but a portion of chocolate is added, typically in the form of sweet cocoa powder, although many varieties use chocolate syrup. Mochas can contain dark or milk chocolate.

December 10, 2010 @ 2:19 PM